Bermuda Race News

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Lessons of a Bermuda Race skipper

The Newport Bermuda Race entry process may seem daunting. But as this report by a former first-timer shows, it’s not all that difficult when done with care. Philip Dickey, the author, skippered his Swan 46 Flying Lady in the 2012...
Michael Keyworth shows how to use a drogue foremergency steering.

Next Offshore Preparedness Seminar, Nov. 7, Westbrook, CT

Addressing the safety, inspection, and other concerns of sailors heading offshore, the next Offshore Preparedness Seminar will be held Saturday Nov. 7 at Pilots Point Marina, Westbrook, CT. Topics include offshore racing safety requirements, navigation and electronic equipment, and preparing the boat...
Royal Mail

Race Bulletin #3, August 20, 2015

Dear Sailors, The 2016 Newport Bermuda Race will include new opportunities for high-performance yachts to compete in celebration of the 50th Thrash to the Onion Patch. We are making a slight change to the St. David’s Lighthouse Division description to...
Flying the Naval Academy's distinctive colors, Swift starts the light-air 2014 race. (Talbot Wilson)

Looking Back: The academy fleet

A highlight of the Newport Bermuda Race has long been the very enthusiastic, and sometimes very successful, participation of  young crews from service academies. When it was first suggested that the US Naval Academy enter a boat in the Bermuda...
Royal Bermuda Yacht Club on the Hamilton waterfront hosts the Newport Bermuda Bace and the King Edward VII Gold Cup Match Racing Championship. (Bob Grieser/PPL)

Looking Back: reaching the goal in hospitable Bermuda

For nearly 110 years, Bermuda Races have started at several American ports. But they all finish at the friendly archipelago that nature and God located 635 miles off the U.S. coast, just enough east of south so the typical race...
Navigator Sheila McCurdy calculated a sextant sight and plots the position suring a vorage in the 1980s. (John Rousmaniere)

Looking Back: A navigator’s race

Here’s a challenge: Sail 635 miles mostly out of sight of land. Cross a chaotic current and then make your landfall on a low island behind a reef. (Oh. . . and you’re navigating a race.) A typical navigator during the...